After providing all the funding for The Brain from Top to Bottom for over 10 years, the CIHR Institute of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Addiction informed us that because of budget cuts, they were going to be forced to stop sponsoring us as of March 31st, 2013.

We have approached a number of organizations, all of which have recognized the value of our work. But we have not managed to find the funding we need. We must therefore ask our readers for donations so that we can continue updating and adding new content to The Brain for Top to Bottom web site and blog.

Please, rest assured that we are doing our utmost to continue our mission of providing the general public with the best possible information about the brain and neuroscience in the original spirit of the Internet: the desire to share information free of charge and with no adverstising.

Whether your support is moral, financial, or both, thank you from the bottom of our hearts!

Bruno Dubuc, Patrick Robert, Denis Paquet, and Al Daigen





Funding Update

September 8th, 2014

Since government funding for The Brain from Top to Bottom ended on March 31, 2013, we have raised nearly $8,000 in private donations from people like you. Over the following five months, from April through August 2014, we received slightly over $1,000 in contributions, which has let me continue writing my weekly posts for The Brain from Top to Bottom blog and keep the site as up to date as possible. Many thanks to all of you who sent in donations.


Monday, 9 April 2012
Better Optical Illusions

illusion-d'optiqueOptical illusions are fascinating in many ways—they can create objects that cannot exist, movement in a static image, different colours with the same colour, and so on. They can also give us a better understanding of how the human visual system works, as witness this web site dedicated to the best optical illusions that scientists who study this subject have managed to devise in a contest that is held every year.

kingdom600

© 2007 Kingdom, Yoonessi and Gheorghiu

The example above took first prize in the 2007 contest and actually consists of two identical photos of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, placed side-by-side. But our visual system insists on seeing them as a single picture of two towers, which gives us the impression that the tower on the right is leaning more than the one on the left.

i_lien Best Visual Illusion of the Year

i_lien The Leaning Tower Illusion

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